中文
Select Page

Art Galleries, Museums & Libraries in Northbridge

Discover what's going on in arts, events & culture

Discover what’s going on in arts, events & culture.

Check out travel guides for regional WA

Check out travel guides for regional Western Australia.

Explore winery guides for Perth and regional WA

Check out winery guides for Perth and regional WA.

Galleries in Northbridge


scroll=y


Paper Mountain

Paper Mountain is a Perth based artist run initiative with a gallery, co-working space and studios, located in the heart of Northbridge, WA.

  • Galleries:Artisan Workshop,Art Gallery

Details

  • Open Days:Monday,Tuesday,Wednesday,Thursday,Friday,Saturday,Sunday,Public Holidays

Description

Paper Mountain presents a top notch program of surprising new art and ideas, and is dedicated to supporting a broad span of contemporary art projects. Our space is malleable and we use it to nurture experimentation, to challenge artists’ practices, and to encourage collaboration and skill/resource sharing.
 
Founded in late 2011 by Anna Dunnill, Amber Harries, Stephen Genovese & Joanna Sulkowski, Paper Mountain is currently co-directed by a team of eight who between them manage: the studios, special projects, exhibitions, events, communications, finance, media & artistic programming.
 

PEEK-A-BOO GALLERY, GOTHAM STUDIOS INC

Peek-a-Boo is the street level window gallery of Gotham Studios Inc, operates 24/7 and celebrates its Silver Anniversary this year

  • Galleries:Installation,Painting,Photography,Sculpture,Textiles,Artist Studio,Mixed Media,Drawing
  • Open Days/times:BY APPOINTMENT ONLY
  • Represented Artists:Gotham Studio Collective artists and non-member artists

Details

  • Open Days:By Appointment Only

Description

Gotham Studios Inc and the Peek-a-Boo Gallery

Gotham Studios was established in 1987 and is Western Australia’s longest running artist-run initiative (and Australia's third-oldest), Gotham celebrating its 25th anniversary this year since being officially incorporated in 1988.   Along with other heritage buildings in the precinct, the building was closed for redevelopment in 2009. The studios were officially re-opened by The Right Honourable The Lord Mayor Lisa Scaffidi in September 2011 for Gotham Returns, which included a full-scale exhibition inside and throughout the building, and also the re-launch of the Peek-a-Boo Gallery - Gotham’s own ground floor window-box gallery - presenting a small-scale group show of small works.

 

During 25 years of artistic production, over 130 visual artists have had access to invaluable inner-city working space. Long time member Andrew Nicholls notes that Gotham has 

‘collectively made an assertive contribution to Western Australian culture over the past two decades, with many of the state’s leading visual artists, writers and curators based at the studio throughout its lifespan. Gotham is an icon of independent visual arts practice in the state.’ (Nicholls, 2013, p 3)

Established as 'the smallest gallery in the southern hemisphere' when the studios were first launched in the late 1980s (at an even smaller scale than its current floor-to-ceiling format), Peek-a-Boo today presents exhibitions of contemporary art from a gallery space only three square metres in size. Exhibitions can be viewed free of charge from the pavement at 57 James Street, twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week. Initially intended as a playful dig at Gotham’s neighbour, the Perth Institute of Contemporary Arts, Peek-a-Boo was founded to allow experimental and non-institutional art to thrive at street level in Perth’s cultural centre. 

Last February and March, Gotham Gone Wild  honoured this legacy via a programme of surprising and celebratory artworks and interventions for Perth’s Fringe World 2013. In celebration of the Studio’s twenty-fifth anniversary, the artists of Gotham presented a changing programme of performances, sound works, temporary installations and events at Peek-a-Boo including: public life drawing from the street as models posed in the window; and night drawing - the artists drawing spectators on the glass and vice versa. Gotham Gone Wild complemented Le Salon Scintillant (winner of the Best Visual Art Award for Fringeworld 2013), Gotham’s inaugural Silver Anniversary exhibition at Moana Project Space, Perth.

Gotham has collaborated in the past with non-member artists at Peek-a-Boo, but this year, the gallery programme also features 7 exhibitions from exclusively non-member artists.  In November, Gotham Studios will be opening its doors to the public for the city-wide event, Perth Open House 2013, and has invited local artist Ben Crappsley to be the Peek-a-Boo artist for that time.

Perth: an accidental history

See your city through a different lens. View rare archival photographs of Perth dating back to the early 20th century, many on display for the first time.

Details

Description

See your city through a different lens.

View rare archival photographs of Perth dating back to the early 20th century, many on display for the first time.

Features digital content from the State Library of Western Australia and City of Perth Cultural Heritage Collections.

 

PICA: Perth Institute of Contemporary Arts

The Perth Institute of Contemporary Arts (PICA) is one of Australia's leading centres for the development and presentation of contemporary art.

  • Galleries:Installation,Painting,Photography,Sculpture,Mixed Media
  • Open Days/times:Tuesday – Sunday 10am – 5pm

Details

  • Open Days:Tuesday,Wednesday,Thursday,Friday,Saturday,Sunday

Description

The Perth Institute of Contemporary Arts (PICA) is one of Australia's leading centres for the development and presentation of contemporary art.

Housed in a large and striking heritage building in the heart of Perth, Western Australia, PICA is the city's focal point for those wishing to experience the best of Australian and international visual, performing and cross-disciplinary art.

PICA is both a producing and presenting institution that runs a year round program of changing exhibitions, seasons in contemporary dance, theatre and performance and a range of interdisciplinary projects. It boasts one of the largest and most breath-taking exhibition spaces in Australia and has become known for the leading role it plays in the presentation of significant new work.

PICA's key aim is to promote, support and present contemporary arts and to stimulate critical discussion around the arts and broader cultural issues. Providing a site for experimentation, critical analysis, discussion and debate is fundamental to its charter. PICA is known for the rigour and breadth of its artistic and education programs, high production standards and impeccable presentation. In many aspects of its operations, PICA might be understood as an incubator: providing resources, mentoring and support for both emerging and mature artists whilst promoting new and emerging ideas, forms and practices to the broader community.

PICA is an icon of contemporary thinking - it is a catalyst for innovative and ground breaking art and culture. Not constrained by convention, PICA gives artists and audiences a glimpse of what is possible. 

Sacha Barker

From June 18 - July 29 Sacha was artist-in-residence at PICA.

  • Open Days/times:BY APPOINTMENT ONLY
  • Galleries:Artist Studio

Details

  • Open Days:By Appointment Only

Description

Sacha Barker’s art practice seeks to extend understandings of traditional art media. Her handmade textile works and installations use humble materials to explore concepts of narrative, personal history and socio-cultural meanings. Barker’s slow, laboured practice exists in direct contrast with expanding forms of digital production and consumption, her attention to detail amplifying connections between ‘the maker’ and ‘the made’.

During her residency Sacha will explore the potential for participation and the performative aspects of her practice through her ongoing project Thingship. Thingship is an intricate, compartmentalised cardboard vessel; a craft for transporting small handheld objects across time and space. Objects are concealed in the ships compartments and studio visitors are invited to exchange their own things with the Thingship.

On July 10 Sacha Barker runs a hands-on building workshop, perfect for young artists and inventors who want to become apprentice cardboard carpenters! Suitable for children agred 12+. Participants are invited to bring a small handheld object (small enough to be hidden inside a closed fist) to exchange with an object already in the ThingShip!

Visit pica.org.au to book your spot.

 

Sisters of Mercy Perth

Catherine McAuley, along with two companions, Anna Maria Doyle and Elizabeth Harley, professed their vows and became the first Sisters of Mercy.

  • Museums:Other
  • Open Days/times:BY APPOINTMENT ONLY

Details

  • Open Days:By Appointment Only

Description

Catherine recognised the needs of those who were marginalised and oppressed by unjust social attitudes and practices of the day. She responded by establishing a House of Mercy in Dublin which provided educational, religious and social services for women and children who were at risk of homelessness through exploitation and entrenched poverty.

Coolock House

Catherine McAuley was born in Dublin on September 29, 1778 and had two siblings, James William and Mary.  Her father James died in 1783, and her mother Elinor, in 1798. In 1803 she became the household manager and companion of an elderly, childless, and wealthy Quaker couple, William and Catherine Callaghan who lived at Coolock House. She did not dream that when William Callaghan died in 1822, Catherine Callaghan having died in 1819, she would become the sole residuary legatee of their estate and much of their savings.

In 1824, her inheritance now settled, Catherine implemented a longstanding desire: she built a large house on Baggot Street, Dublin as a school for poor girls and a shelter for homeless servant girls and women.

The House of Mercy

On September 24, 1827, the House of Mercy was opened on Baggot Street in Dublin. Anna Maria Doyle and Catherine Byrne, Catherine McAuley’s first co-workers, moved into the House, while Catherine herself divided her time between Coolock House, her brother-in-law’s home, and Baggot Street.

House of Mercy, Baggot Street, Dublin

As the number of lay co-workers at Baggot Street increased, so did severe lay and clerical criticism of the House: Why did these women look like a religious order, yet not abide by the normal regulations of religious orders? Who was this “upstart” Miss McAuley? Why was the “unlearned sex” doing the work of the clergy?

By 1830, it became necessary for Catherine’s work to be formalised as a religious order. To this end, Catherine, Anna Maria Doyle, and Elizabeth Harley entered the Presentation Convent in Dublin to begin their formal preparation to become religious sisters.

On 12 December, 1831, Catherine McAuley, with two companions, made religious profession in the Presentation Convent of Georges Hill, Dublin where they had spent the previous year of the novitiate. On that day Archbishop Daniel Murray formally blessed the first Convent of Mercy at the House of Mercy in Baggot Street and Catherine was installed as mother superior of the Sisters of Mercy. A month later the Archbishop received seven of Catherine’s helpers as the first Mercy novices. These young women had worked with her from the beginning.

Catherine’s concept of a Religious Institute included an availability for ministry not typical of religious orders at that time. Feeling themselves called to serve Christ as the needs of His poor demanded and encouraged by the Archbishop, Catherine and her companions took as their special works the instruction of poor girls, visitation of the sick and the protection of distressed women of good character. They became known as the ‘walking nuns’. These sisters, who were without the usual strict enclosure and whose convents quickly became part of many dioceses, inspired local girls to see and meet local needs, and the new Institute began to spread rapidly.

Founding Mothers

The rapid expansion of the Sisters of Mercy in the first decade of the new Institute flowed from Catherine McAuley’s ever generous response to human need.

As well as in Dublin, Catherine founded seven additional autonomous Convents of Mercy around Ireland and two in England as well as two branch houses of the Dublin community. She travelled with the founding sisters by stage coach, canal boat, steam packet and railway, humorously enduring the fatigue and inconvenience such travel entailed She would remain with each Community for at least a month, anxious to “begin well,” so the poor could be immediately served. She said, “God knows I would rather be cold and hungry than that the poor in Kingstown or elsewhere should be deprived of any consolation in our power to afford.”

Back in Dublin there were many trials – her niece Catherine died of consumption in August 1837; there was a two-year controversy over appointment of a chaplain to serve the House of Mercy; a lawsuit was unfairly settled against her for the cost of building a poor school in Kingstown and her nephews Robert and James died in 1840 and 1841 respectively. In the midst of these sufferings and others, which she chose to embrace as the “Cross of Christ,” she wrote hundreds of affectionate, even humorous, letters to the sisters in the new foundations and submitted to officials in Rome her proposed Rule and Constitutions of the Sisters of Mercy. By May 1841 Catherine, now almost sixty-three, was worn out by her many labours for “Christ’s dear poor” and “tormented” by a persistent cough.

Her Final Months

Catherine’s Grave

Catherine’s energies in the summer of 1841 were occupied with retreat instructions for postulants and novices, preparations for reception and profession ceremonies and plans for the departure of the sisters to a new foundation in Birmingham, England on August 20. In Birmingham, she was tired and confined to one room and her cough worsened.

Back at Baggot Street by September 21 she saw a physician who declared her right lung “diseased.” Making light of his verdict, she nonetheless delegated some of her responsibilities to her assistant, though she herself continued to write loving letters to many sisters, scarcely mentioning her illness. At the end of October she became bed-ridden, and was anointed on November 8. As she lay dying on November 11, fully aware of the fatigue and sorrow of those around her bed, she made one last request: she asked a sister to tell the community to “get a good cup of tea when I am gone and to comfort one another”.  She died that evening at ten minutes to eight and was buried the following Monday in the newly created cemetery at Baggot Street.

At the time of her death there were 100 Sisters of Mercy in ten foundations.  Shortly thereafter, small groups of Sisters left Ireland to establish new foundations on the east and west coasts of the United States, in Newfoundland, Australia, New Zealand, and Argentina.

Total worldwide vowed membership is about 7,000. The Mercy International Centre in Dublin, Ireland, is the international “home” of the Sisters of Mercy worldwide.

In 1978, the cause for the beatification of the Servant of God Catherine McAuley was opened by Pope Paul VI. Catherine McAuley was declared Venerable by Pope John Paul II, on April 9th, 1990.

 

The Nostalgia Box

The Nostalgia offers a fun, unique experience for visitors to learn about the history of video games. Uncover some old friends, fun facts and unexpected creations as you explore the Museum.

  • Museums:Other
  • Open Days/times:11AM - 4PM, Sat 11AM - 5PM

Details

  • Open Days:Monday,Wednesday,Thursday,Friday,Saturday,Sunday

Description

The Nostalgia Box: Australia’s first and only interactive Video Game Console Museum, located in Perth. Discover how a simple bouncing-block video game created the billion-dollar gaming industry we know today. The Museum is home to an impressive collection of over 100 consoles dating from console gaming’s beginnings in the 1970s to the high-tech wonders of today. Uncover some old friends, fun facts and unexpected creations as you explore the journey of the mighty video game console.  Then replay all the classic games like Pong, Space Invaders, Super Mario, Sonic, Crash Bandicoot and many more in the gaming area. The perfect way to experience game history! Come relive your childhood again and share these magical moments with the new generation. 

Turner Galleries

Turner Galleries exhibits critically acclaimed contemporary art by Perth and interstate artists.

  • Galleries:Installation,Jewellery,Mixed Media,Painting,Animations,Art Gallery,Ceramics,Drawing,Glass,Photography,Sculpture,Textiles
  • Open Days/times:Tuesday - Saturday 11am - 5pm

Details

  • Open Days:Tuesday,Wednesday,Thursday,Friday,Saturday

Description

Turner Galleries is one of the largest commercial galleries in Perth. There are usually two solo exhibitions on view by leading local and interstate artists.  These are changed every five weeks and the public is welcomed to attend the openings.  It's easy to be notified abou our events, just join our mailing list via our comprehensive website.

You can also view our current exhibitons, browse through our stockroom, enjoy previous exhibitions, join the Art Angels or learn about our Artist in Residence Programme on our website.

A brief history: From October 1999 to February 2006, Turner Galleries was known as The Church Gallery. For most of that time it was located at 264 Stirling Highway, in Claremont Western Australia. In December 2005 it moved to temporary premises, at 452 William Street Northbridge, not far from the city centre, whilst a new gallery space was being prepared.
In March 2007 the gallery relocated and opened with the new name Turner Galleries. The refurbished 1920's factory workshop is located at 470 William Street Northbridge, near the corner of Bulwer Street.

Turner Galleries displays a broad range of contemporary art that is unique, challenging, critical and/or experimental. This encompasses painting, printmaking, sculpture, ceramics, installation and new technologies. The gallery is owned and directed by Helen Turner, and managed and curated by Allison Archer.

Turner Galleries is also home to an innovative artist in residence programme, and its sponsorship group, the Turner Galleries Art Angels Incorporated. 

WA Museum

CLOSED UNTIL 2019.

  • Museums:Local History,Natural History,Science,State Museums
  • Open Days/times:Opening 2020

Details

  • Facilities:Free

Description

The Western Australian Museum is the State’s premier cultural organisation, housing WA’s scientific and cultural collection. For over 120 years the Western Australian Museum has been making the State's natural and social heritage accessible and engaging through research, exhibitions and public programs.

You May Also Like

5 kitchen staples that are surprisingly easy to make

5 kitchen staples that are surprisingly easy to make

After over a week of social distancing, we’re sure you’re over it by now. You’ve probably already caught up on...
Read More
There’s a new, safe way to watch Netflix together!

There’s a new, safe way to watch Netflix together!

Getting bored of all your solo binge-watching sessions? Forgetting what it feels like to have friends? We have some good...
Read More
The lighter side of COVID-19

The lighter side of COVID-19

We are currently experiencing an unprecedented global pandemic and losing hundreds of lives – along with our livelihoods and minds...
Read More
Local breweries now offering delivery

Local breweries now offering delivery

More and more local breweries are offering home delivery to support themselves after their prime form of income was slashed...
Read More
State of Emergency to be enforced with new police powers and a 200-strong “Enforcement Squad” to hit the streets of Perth!

State of Emergency to be enforced with new police powers and a 200-strong “Enforcement Squad” to hit the streets of Perth!

If you already felt like WA was turning into a police state, you aren’t going to like what’s coming. Today,...
Read More
WA winery online sales are open for business

WA winery online sales are open for business

The state government just threw the WA wine industry a much-needed lifeline, allowing West Australians to order up to one...
Read More
COVID-19 WA and GLOBAL update for March 26

COVID-19 WA and GLOBAL update for March 26

COVID-19 is one in a 100 year tragedy and there is understandably a lot of fear. There are a lot...
Read More
Local online food and clothing stores that deliver to your door

Local online food and clothing stores that deliver to your door

With most of the local shops closing, online stores will be the major source for your shopping fix. Online shopping...
Read More
Premium Perth restaurants setting a new trend in ‘dating at home’

Premium Perth restaurants setting a new trend in ‘dating at home’

Amongst many other things, self isolation means we are all going to have to make a serious effort when it...
Read More
The small town in Italy’s ‘danger zone’ that beat the virus

The small town in Italy’s ‘danger zone’ that beat the virus

In a sea of misery and impending doom, the story of Vo is an inspiring display of how leadership, decisive...
Read More
SCOOP