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Activity Sites Type Things to do in Western Australia

Things To Do in Western Australia


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Climbing at Bob’s Hollow

15km south of the town of Margaret River is a little corner of paradise called Bob's Hollow, one of WA’s best sport climbing crags, offering steep limestone walls and more than 20 established routes.

Details

  • Activities:Rock Climbing
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

Bob’s is famous for steep limestone walls, strange stalactite formations and white sandy beaches. Mostly climbs of 15-20m. Reach the top and be rewarded with breathtaking views of the ocean and surrounding bushland. It is not a sea cliff though; the crag is around 100m inland from the beach.

The crag is a beautiful limestone cliff with vertical to steep overhanging walls. The limestone is generally very solid, although it has only a hard outer crust. Some parts of the cliff, such as the large open cave in the southern section of the crag, show the soft sandy material that lies behind the crust. Be warned that limestone caves and overhangs are potentially dangerous – there have been instances of limestone caves collapsing along the coast.

Almost all climbs are equipped with glue-in bolts and lower-off anchors so you can leave the rack at home: all you’ll be needing is a set of draws, although, a few climbs require bolts plates so check the route descriptions.

Bob’s Hollow can be climbed at all year round. Although it gets very hot in summer, the cliff faces east so it gets morning shade, with the northern most section being in shade until around 2pm. In other seasons, the crag can be climbed at all day, even if there is light rain although high humidity will make all the holds very greasy.

WARNING

The Bob’s Hollow crag is situated in the Leeuwin-Naturaliste Nation Park and is managed by WA’s Conservation and Land Management (CALM) body. The CALM management plan for the park states that climbing is not permitted on any limestone cliffs within the national park. Therefore, you climb at Bob’s Hollow at your own risk. Camping is not permitted here – at the car park or in the cave. CALM will fine you if they catch you.

ACCESS

There are a number of options for getting to Bob’s Hollow. If you have a 4WD you can drive to the crag via a rocky track. From Margaret River, travel south along Caves Rd. Approximately 2.5 km south of the Redgate Rd intersection, turn right (west) onto an unsealed track (Bob’s Hollow Rd), which is opposite the Calgardup Cave car park. The drive to the crag along the track takes around 15 min. The track is pretty rough with some tricky rocky sections to negotiate and thick scrub close to the track on either side just waiting to put scratches in your paintwork. A 4WD with decent clearance and low range is required here – no Subaru’s or Honda’s unless you’re happy to collect a few dents and potentially more serious damage on the under-body. At the car park, walk down the gully to the north and follow the base of the cliff, past the cave, for around 200m to the first routes (Northern End).

If you don’t have a 4WD or don’t want to risk any damage, you’re going to have to walk around 45 mins. You can walk along the 4WD track however it is much nicer to walk in along Conto’s Beach from the south. Follow Caves Rd past the 4WD track entrance and turn right at the Lake Cave entrance. After several hundred metres turn left into Conto Rd and continue for approximately 4 km before turning right at the Conto Spring Beach sign. Proceed to car park. From the car park walk north along the beach for about 45 minutes to Bob’s Hollow. You will walk past Split Rock, a rocky point and from there you will have a further 300m before you see the Bob’s Hollow cliffs a couple of hundred metres inland. There are several tracks into Bob’s from the beach.

 

Climbing at Mountain Quarry

Located on the slopes of Greenmount Hill overlooking Perth, this park offers great opportunities for bush walking, wildlife observation, sightseeing and photography.

Details

  • Activities:Rock Climbing
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

GOOD FOR BEGINNERS

Mountain Quarry | For some of the best climbing in the metro area, this is ideal for first-time abseiling attempts. Located off Coulston Road in the Greenmount National Park, it offers a range of climbs for beginners to advanced grades. Most of the routes have been bolted and a number of anchors have been set.

Climbing at Wallcliffe

The sweep of limestone stretches along the southern bank of the picturesque Margaret River.

Details

  • Activities:Rock Climbing
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

Wallcliffe | A sport climbing area with almost 20 established routes, Walcliffe is located near Prevelly Park and accessed off Caves Road via Surfers Point Road. The deceptively steep sweep of limestone stretches for 100m along the southern bank of the picturesque Margaret River. There is an interesting bouldering area on the right-hand end of the cliff with safe landings, featuring numerous edges, pockets and slopers, plus a long traverse with many variants.

Climbing at Wilyabrup

The cliffs are well worth the rock climbing and abseiling if that’s your thing, or just explore around and admire the incredibly beautiful and dramatic coastal views.

Details

  • Activities:Rock Climbing
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

Wilyabrup | The largest and best-known climbing spot in the region, this is superb, sun-drenched granite stretching over 500m along the ocean front. There are many climbs for various grades, and options for traditional climbing. One of the most famous climbs has a resident carpet python on it (we won’t tell you which one!). Access is off Wilyabrup Road and a short but beautiful hike in. Follow the sound of crashing waves. 

Cool Cabanas Glamping & Picnics

THE ULTIMATE PERTH GLAMPING & PICNIC EXPERIENCE

Details

  • Activities:Food & Wine,Camping
  • Type:Towns,Regions,Activity Sites

Description

We hire fun & colourful, stylishly themed Bell Tents ideal for all occasions. Weddings, Fun Picnics & Parties, Couples Retreats, Romantic Surprises, Proposals, Birthday Parties, Visiting Guests, Family Get-Togethers, Kid's Sleepovers, Weekends Away, Fancy Dress Occasions, Hens Nights, Girls Nights, Anniversaries & the list goes on ... We will travel to your chosen location, set it all up and take it all down for you when you finish! We supply Picnic & Party Furniture, Wedding Tents, Tables for Food & Drink, Grazing Tables, Bedding, Linen, Decorative Theming, Ottomans, Cushions, Lighting & Flooring. We have Bell Tents & Set Up Parties for every occasion! Email us at [email protected]

Diving at Busselton Jetty

This is the second longest wooden jetty in the southern hemisphere.

Details

  • Activities:Diving
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

Best area to dive is about the last 300mtrs of the jetty, you can dive it using the tourist train that takes you almost all the way out, but check on running times first. You can also hire a trolley from Naturaliste Dive (you pass it on the way to the jetty) but 2kms is a hell of a walk (don’t even think about carrying your gear!!!!). 

Simplest method is a boat, you don’t need anything huge as it’s very protected here and the ramp is right next to the jetty. If you get a bit cool during your dive, the bakery next to the dive shop make the most awesome pastries (pies, sausage rolls etc). 

This is also the best night dive!

Diving at Cod Spot

The site features a long wall about 4m high covered in a variety of soft and hard corals.

Details

  • Activities:Diving
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

At the northern end of the wall is a sand patch which if crossed for approx 10-15m will lead to a large bommie. This is, during the season, a manta ray cleaning station. Several mantas can be at the location at any one time.

The location got its name form the presence of several large potato cod resident here. They will often follow a diver around the site as a large school or circle them during safety stops.

Diving at Crystal Palace

Situated on the south east side of the Island this ‘hidden’ dive site is spectacular.

Details

  • Activities:Diving
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

Positioned approximately 850m South west of Dyer Island, ‘Crystals’ has a depth range of 8-18m.Entering the water, which is generally quite calm due to the position of the site, the first thing you will notice is the sheer amount of caves and swim through’s that you can see just from the surface. Looking down you will know straight away that 1 tank is not going to be enough!

As you descend into this array of caves you will see many fish of all species scarper into different directions to make way for you. This is the site where you are most likely to see just about every species of fish you are likely to encounter around Rottnest in the 1 dive! From the colourful Harlequin fish to the breathtaking big Blue Gropers, that can push you backwards just from the power of a tail kick in the opposite direction. Stay there a while though because he is sure to return curiously to see his new ‘Scuba friend’.

Once you have had a good look around over the top of the reef, begin to explore the subterranean caves for more exciting encounters! On this dive expect to see large Samson fish, the occasional Dhufish, Western Blue Devils, Buffalo Bream, Morwongs, Box fish, Leather-jackets and of course Crayfish! The topography of Crystal Palace is just brilliant with constant caves, holes and swim through’s; this is a dive that you will not get bored with. The site covers around 6-800m of awesome reef, which will excite even the most experienced diver.

For diving enquiries, contact Perth Scuba. 

Diving at Fish Eyes

Reef line along sand which consists of granite boulders covered with a wide variety of hard coral, soft coral and sponges.

Details

  • Activities:Diving
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

You will find a wide variety of fish life and echinoderms. Towards the end of this dive you will come into “leafy sea dragon country” which we often see at this site. You can often see sea lions and occasionally turtles, believe it or not!!

To find, proceed to Black Point from the Fishery Beach Marina. Approximately half way along the cliffs you will find a sculpted rock hole in the shape of an eye socket. Anchor at the base of this. Once in the water, proceed east following the cliffs.

Diving at HMAS Perth Wreck

The former HMAS Perth guided missile destroyer was scuttled in 35m of water in King George Sound in November 2001.

Details

  • Activities:Diving
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

Serving in the Royal Australian Navy, the HMAS Perth sailed more than a million nautical miles in deployments around the world. The vessel was damaged by enemy fire in the Vietnam conflict. Thankfully, no one was injured as the shell punctured the vessel but failed to explode.

The 133m destroyer now provides divers with a wonderful opportunity to explore its underwater interiors.

Diving at Point Peron

This is a fair weather dive site with many swim throughs and one or two larger caves. Popular for snorkellers as well, so it’s a great family day out.

Details

  • Activities:Diving
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

Entry is easy via a few steps with a hand rail into the water. There is a swim of about 130m to mushroom rocks, 300m to the suggested dive site (depth 7m) and it’s about 500m to the outer reef which lies in about 10m. There are reefs to the North which are a bit of a hike to lug equipment to but worth it if you are looking for deeper caves and swim throughs.

This site is part of the Shoal Water Islands Marine Park. An alternative entry for diving the Northern Point is the car park on the Northern side of the peninsular. But a long and boring swim over sand.

The geology is limestone and whilst largely fished out, there is nevertheless plenty to see including: Sea urchins, anemones, turban shells, sea stars, octopus, sea horses, and lots of colourful growth including hard and soft corals and bait fish which are predated upon by the penguins, etc. Take a torch for the caves but be careful of overhead environments.

Diving at Porpoise Bay Caves

Almost directly linked to Crystal Palace, towards the Island, directly out of Porpoise Bay, Porpoise Bay Caves make for an exciting second dive after the ‘Palace'.

Details

  • Activities:Diving
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

There are brilliant photographic opportunities here with divers quite regularly seeing Sea Turtles, Leafy Sea Dragons and Fire fish (a species of Lionfish). This dive is simply a sit back and watch the world go by, or explore the caves until your heart is content type of dive. No cave here is the same.

Crayfish hunters be sure to take your loop with you, the Crayfish are big out here!

The best way to dive Porpoise bay caves is to start on the southern end of the reef and work your way toward the island. Be sure to get a good compass bearing, as many caves look alike from the surface and the currents here are a little stronger than Crystal Palace.

The dive is such an exciting array of caves that you will very easily lose track of where you are and that could lead to a long swim back to the boat if you are not careful. This dive site has a maximum depth of around 18m and runs up to about 8m. Choose this site when winds are light to non-existent as this site does ‘chop up’ fairly quickly on a stiff breeze, which can make the dive a little uncomfortable.

Marine life you can expect to see here are similar to Crystal Palace and you can be sure to see something new every time you dive here.

Contact Perth Scuba for further information and diving enquiries. 

Diving at South Tomi

Fascinating marine ecosystems and stories of pirates, pursuits and poaching can be discovered off Geraldton on a South Tomi diving adventure.

Details

  • Activities:Diving
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

Geraldton is already renowned as the gateway to the scuba diving wonderland of the Abrolhos Islands. Now, however, this coastal city 450km north of Perth has another underwater attraction to lure diving enthusiasts – a sunken pirate ship.
The ship is the 57m confiscated fishing vessel South Tomi, which was scuttled in September last year to serve as an artificial reef and dive attraction. Already dozens of divers have visited the wreckage, just two and a half nautical miles from Geraldton city’s shores. Rock lobsters line the sand at the ship's base, schools of fish dart through the corridors and seaweed grows from every surface. And they say swimming weightlessly through the ship's cabins, galley, wheelhouse and bathroom is a surreal, almost eerie, experience.
The feeling is all the more surreal when you consider Tomi's wildly colourful history. Just two years ago, this very ship was sailing the southern oceans – a modern-day pirate ship plundering high seas for precious Patagonian toothfish. However, this illegal fishing activity came to a dramatic end after Tomi was captured in what was then the longest pursuit in Australian maritime history.
 Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA) crew pursued the vessel for 6100km over 14 days, from Heard Island 4100km south-west of Perth to within 390km of Cape Town, South Africa. Although the AFMA vessel remained within about two nautical miles of the Tomi throughout the chase, it eventually took an Australian Defence Force deployment of 35 officers to South Africa to wrest control of the vessel.
After storming the Tomi they then turned her around for the 19-day, 8500km return journey to Fremantle. The pursuit made news headlines across the country as the Australian population became entranced by the pirate-like story of Tomi's capture. Then Tomi made headlines once again after her spectacular scuttling, when international explosives experts set off a series of detonations, sending Tomi to a watery grave 25m below the surface.
Already sea life has begun inhabiting the vessel. Trevor Beaver, who led the scuttling effort, expects the fish, coral and weeds to increase substantially as full marine ecosystems develop over the new few years.
Trevor takes dive charters to the Tomi wreckage for qualified scuba divers, dependant on numbers and weather conditions. His business, Batavia Coast Dive Academy, is also the place to go to receive the necessary permits to dive to the vessel, if you wish to visit by yourself.
Trevor says the dive is suitable for any qualified diver, providing the weather is suitable. His charters include full tours of the vessel, through each of decks, the galley, engine room, toilet and wheelhouse. Your guide will point out small oddities like old, weed-covered boots nailed to the floor at the helm and fish cleverly disguised in their new home.
If you’ve got it, you're welcome to bring your own dive gear on a charter, but Batavia Coast Dive Academy can also hire you everything from wetsuits to scuba tanks, masks and fins. Chartered trips to the dive site cost $105 with scuba equipment included and $65 without equipment. Permits to visit the wreck cost $80 for one year, $40 for a week and $25 for a day, if you’re interested in exploring the scuttled ship in your own time.
Batavia Coast Dive also offers dive courses, which give you diving qualifications recognised anywhere in the world. For more information contact Batavia Coast Dive Academy on (08) 9921 4229.

Diving At Swirl Reef

So called because of the “footprint” visible on the surface of the water after a swell has passed through.

Details

  • Activities:Diving
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

The reef is virtually formed like a crater with a hollow in the center and many swim through’s accessible from the inside, especially the northwest and southeast sections of the reef. The most awesome swim through is accessible only from the outside and is again on the northwest side, with a huge cavernous opening at seabed level.

Contact Perth Scuba for diving enquiries. 

Diving at the Macedon and Denton Holmes Wrecks

The resting ground of not one but two shipwrecks - perfect for underwater exploration.

Details

  • Activities:Diving
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

The Macedon was built in Liverpool in 1870 and was carrying 50 horses along with its cargo and passengers before it hit rock and sunk in 1883. A few years later in 1890, cargo vessel Denton Holmes joined it at the bottom of the sea after striking the reef off Rottnest Island's coastline. 

Located virtually on top of each other, these wrecks lie on top of Kingston Reef just out from Thompson’s Bay. They have been prone to a lot of swell and surge, so apart from timber and iron remnants there is not a lot left. Watch out when you anchor near here and do NOT tie up to the big yellow mooring, as the local glass bottom boat cruises in here to show people the wreck.

For diving enquiries, contact Perth Scuba. 

 

Diving at the Wreck Of The Shark

Lying in the shallow water near the beach at Henrietta Rocks, the shipwreck provides an exciting environment for adventurous snorkellers.

Details

  • Activities:Diving,Snorkelling
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

 

The Shark met its end when it crashed into the reef around Rottnest Island, and now sits 50m off from the shoreline. Visible from the lookout over Henrietta Rocks, the wreck is home to a crew of fishy folk. 

Image used with permission from Rottnest Island Authority. 

 

Diving at Turtle Bay

This is a flat topped limestone reef that projects out about 500m in to the waters of the bay.

Details

  • Activities:Diving
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

The sides range from 1 metre high to 3 metres further out. A wide range of life lives along the walls and in the many nooks and crannies with in the limestone itself. The base of the ledges grade into rubble and then into the fine white sand which makes up the beach. As it is close to shore a surge develops towards low tide that can make the closer in section unpleasant.

Along these walls there is a number species of hard and soft corals offering some great photo opportunities. A wide range of fish are also seen. A survey done in south passage at the southern end of the island reported 323 species of fish. This end does not appear to be much less. The beach is a nesting beach for loggerhead turtles and they are often seen in the waters of the bay. Dolphins, sharks, whales, manta rays and whale sharks are also seen in this area.

The large fish feeding event in early 2001 which featured hundreds of sharks, Brydes and humpback whales and large pelagic fish was between this reef and cape Inscription.

DIRECTIONS: Northern point of Dirk Hartog Island, just to the east of the Cape Inscription Lighthouse. The main bit of reef runs out from the beach just east of the old jetty pylons. This is about 20 Nautical miles from Denham and is exposed in northerly weather. This is rare but caution is required. The crossing from Denham is good in most conditions. In rough seas head across to homestead bay and follow the coast up. unless you are experienced in offshore boating use one of the many charter boats working out of Denham.

Diving at Yanchep Dog Beach

This is a fair weather shore dive good for crays when they are of size and not well concealed towards the outer edge of the reef.

Details

  • Activities:Diving
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

If the sea has been calm for a few days you’ll get good Viz.

Entry is easy via a 180m track (gear up in the car park). There are two options; a short swim over very shallow reef to the North to 4m marked above, or a longer track which is about 550m out to the outside of the outer reef which maxes out at 10m.If you do this track travel South along the reef for 200m (make sure you penetrate the reef occasionally to make the most of it), then swim 550m back.

The geology is limestone and there is plenty to see including; sea urchins, anemones, turban shells, sea stars, octopus, prawns, cray fish, cuttlefish, blue devils and ox eyes, juvenile pink snapper, hard and soft corals, nudibranchs and even lionfish! Take a torch for the overhanging ledges and move the kelp out of the way to peer underneath – Wear gloves! Caves, such as they are, are tight. Be careful of overhead environments.

Fishing at Port Denison Marina

The twin towns of Dongara Port Denison are well known for a range of marine delicacies.

Details

  • Activities:Fishing
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

 You can try your luck at catching favourites such as tailor, bream, dhufish, silver dream, whiting and mulloway at the jetties, the platform or any of our beaches.

You can also bring your boat with you to try your luck at offshore fishing, which can produce great catches of pink snapper, dhufish, tailor, baldchin groper and much more.

Crab nets are also available for hire from Breeze Inn.

Snorkelling at Fish Hook Bay

A secluded, enclosed bay with calm shallow water and pristine snorkelling conditions

Details

  • Activities:Snorkelling
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

Fish Hook Bay is located on the western coastline of Rottnest Island, named for its curved shape reminiscent of a fish-hook. The bay features a sandy, white shore for sun-bakers and a vibrant community of fish for curious snorkellers and divers to discover. 

Image used with permission from Rottnest Island Authority. 

Snorkelling At Little Armstrong Bay

Lined by reef and bordered by coastal land features such as archways and caverns, Little Armstrong Bay is popular amongst seaside adventurers.

Details

  • Activities:Snorkelling
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

Little Armstrong Bay is located on the North Point of Rottnest Island, within a marine sanctuary protecting the diverse fishlife inhabiting the area. 

It is suitable for an array of recreational activities including swimming, coastal exploration and snorkelling. 

Image used with permission from Tourism WA. 

Snorkelling at Little Parakeet Bay

Calm conditions for snorkellers of all abilities with plenty of opportunities for fish-spotting

Details

  • Activities:Snorkelling
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

Busiest in summer and earlier in the mornings, Little Parakeet Bay is great for snorkelling and swimming, protected by the surrounding reef and enclosed by the cliff faces. It is within cycling distance of the settlement so you can make an afternoon of it and soak your feet in the cooling water after your journey. 

 

Snorkelling At Mary Cove

A secluded snorkelling experience in one of Kitson Point's idyllic enclosed coves

Details

  • Activities:Snorkelling
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

Snorkellers of varying abilities will be able to enjoy exploring the coral and fish population living amongst the reef system in Mary Cove, a southern facing protected cove along Rottnest Island's Kitson Point. 

Check beachsafe.org.au for swell conditions before setting out to ensure conditions are suitable. 

Image used with permission from Rottnest Island Authority. 

Snorkelling at Omeo Shipwreck

Discover Coogee's haunting Omeo shipwreck from the water on the award-winning Maritime Trail

Details

  • Activities:Snorkelling
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

Located only 25 metres from the shore, the dive and snorkel trail begin at the Omeo shipwreck and includes:

  • Underwater access to the Omeo shipwreck
  • Underwater art gallery
  • Artificial reef.

The underwater trail begins in shallow water while its westernmost extent reaches a maximum depth of 7 metres. Most of the trail is around 2.5 to 5 metres deep, making it suitable for snorkelers and novice divers. 
The artificial reef and underwater art sculptures around the shipwreck create a linear dive trail and habitat for aquatic life. Underwater educational plaques give information about the Omeo shipwreck, maritime history and aquatic life in the area.

Snorkelling at Uribes Shipwreck

Snorkel by this Scottish braque in Rottnest Island's bustling Thomson Bay

Details

  • Activities:Snorkelling
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

The remains of Uribes lie in the shallow, 3–4 metres waters with parts of the ship's machinery and hull well preserved for snorkellers to peruse. In good weather, it is a safe dive for snorkellers and close to the shore.

Image used with permission from Tourism Western Australia. 

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