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Activity Sites Type Things to do in Perth and Surrounds

Things To Do in Perth And Surrounds


region=perth-and-surrounds&type=things-to-do&categories=180722


Climbing at Mountain Quarry

Located on the slopes of Greenmount Hill overlooking Perth, this park offers great opportunities for bush walking, wildlife observation, sightseeing and photography.

Details

  • Activities:Rock Climbing
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

GOOD FOR BEGINNERS

Mountain Quarry | For some of the best climbing in the metro area, this is ideal for first-time abseiling attempts. Located off Coulston Road in the Greenmount National Park, it offers a range of climbs for beginners to advanced grades. Most of the routes have been bolted and a number of anchors have been set.

Diving at Crystal Palace

Situated on the south east side of the Island this ‘hidden’ dive site is spectacular.

Details

  • Activities:Diving
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

Positioned approximately 850m South west of Dyer Island, ‘Crystals’ has a depth range of 8-18m.Entering the water, which is generally quite calm due to the position of the site, the first thing you will notice is the sheer amount of caves and swim through’s that you can see just from the surface. Looking down you will know straight away that 1 tank is not going to be enough!

As you descend into this array of caves you will see many fish of all species scarper into different directions to make way for you. This is the site where you are most likely to see just about every species of fish you are likely to encounter around Rottnest in the 1 dive! From the colourful Harlequin fish to the breathtaking big Blue Gropers, that can push you backwards just from the power of a tail kick in the opposite direction. Stay there a while though because he is sure to return curiously to see his new ‘Scuba friend’.

Once you have had a good look around over the top of the reef, begin to explore the subterranean caves for more exciting encounters! On this dive expect to see large Samson fish, the occasional Dhufish, Western Blue Devils, Buffalo Bream, Morwongs, Box fish, Leather-jackets and of course Crayfish! The topography of Crystal Palace is just brilliant with constant caves, holes and swim through’s; this is a dive that you will not get bored with. The site covers around 6-800m of awesome reef, which will excite even the most experienced diver.

For diving enquiries, contact Perth Scuba. 

Diving at Point Peron

This is a fair weather dive site with many swim throughs and one or two larger caves. Popular for snorkellers as well, so it’s a great family day out.

Details

  • Activities:Diving
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

Entry is easy via a few steps with a hand rail into the water. There is a swim of about 130m to mushroom rocks, 300m to the suggested dive site (depth 7m) and it’s about 500m to the outer reef which lies in about 10m. There are reefs to the North which are a bit of a hike to lug equipment to but worth it if you are looking for deeper caves and swim throughs.

This site is part of the Shoal Water Islands Marine Park. An alternative entry for diving the Northern Point is the car park on the Northern side of the peninsular. But a long and boring swim over sand.

The geology is limestone and whilst largely fished out, there is nevertheless plenty to see including: Sea urchins, anemones, turban shells, sea stars, octopus, sea horses, and lots of colourful growth including hard and soft corals and bait fish which are predated upon by the penguins, etc. Take a torch for the caves but be careful of overhead environments.

Diving at Porpoise Bay Caves

Almost directly linked to Crystal Palace, towards the Island, directly out of Porpoise Bay, Porpoise Bay Caves make for an exciting second dive after the ‘Palace'.

Details

  • Activities:Diving
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

There are brilliant photographic opportunities here with divers quite regularly seeing Sea Turtles, Leafy Sea Dragons and Fire fish (a species of Lionfish). This dive is simply a sit back and watch the world go by, or explore the caves until your heart is content type of dive. No cave here is the same.

Crayfish hunters be sure to take your loop with you, the Crayfish are big out here!

The best way to dive Porpoise bay caves is to start on the southern end of the reef and work your way toward the island. Be sure to get a good compass bearing, as many caves look alike from the surface and the currents here are a little stronger than Crystal Palace.

The dive is such an exciting array of caves that you will very easily lose track of where you are and that could lead to a long swim back to the boat if you are not careful. This dive site has a maximum depth of around 18m and runs up to about 8m. Choose this site when winds are light to non-existent as this site does ‘chop up’ fairly quickly on a stiff breeze, which can make the dive a little uncomfortable.

Marine life you can expect to see here are similar to Crystal Palace and you can be sure to see something new every time you dive here.

Contact Perth Scuba for further information and diving enquiries. 

Diving At Swirl Reef

So called because of the “footprint” visible on the surface of the water after a swell has passed through.

Details

  • Activities:Diving
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

The reef is virtually formed like a crater with a hollow in the center and many swim through’s accessible from the inside, especially the northwest and southeast sections of the reef. The most awesome swim through is accessible only from the outside and is again on the northwest side, with a huge cavernous opening at seabed level.

Contact Perth Scuba for diving enquiries. 

Diving at the Macedon and Denton Holmes Wrecks

The resting ground of not one but two shipwrecks - perfect for underwater exploration.

Details

  • Activities:Diving
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

The Macedon was built in Liverpool in 1870 and was carrying 50 horses along with its cargo and passengers before it hit rock and sunk in 1883. A few years later in 1890, cargo vessel Denton Holmes joined it at the bottom of the sea after striking the reef off Rottnest Island's coastline. 

Located virtually on top of each other, these wrecks lie on top of Kingston Reef just out from Thompson’s Bay. They have been prone to a lot of swell and surge, so apart from timber and iron remnants there is not a lot left. Watch out when you anchor near here and do NOT tie up to the big yellow mooring, as the local glass bottom boat cruises in here to show people the wreck.

For diving enquiries, contact Perth Scuba. 

 

Diving at the Wreck Of The Shark

Lying in the shallow water near the beach at Henrietta Rocks, the shipwreck provides an exciting environment for adventurous snorkellers.

Details

  • Activities:Diving,Snorkelling
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

 

The Shark met its end when it crashed into the reef around Rottnest Island, and now sits 50m off from the shoreline. Visible from the lookout over Henrietta Rocks, the wreck is home to a crew of fishy folk. 

Image used with permission from Rottnest Island Authority. 

 

Diving at Yanchep Dog Beach

This is a fair weather shore dive good for crays when they are of size and not well concealed towards the outer edge of the reef.

Details

  • Activities:Diving
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

If the sea has been calm for a few days you’ll get good Viz.

Entry is easy via a 180m track (gear up in the car park). There are two options; a short swim over very shallow reef to the North to 4m marked above, or a longer track which is about 550m out to the outside of the outer reef which maxes out at 10m.If you do this track travel South along the reef for 200m (make sure you penetrate the reef occasionally to make the most of it), then swim 550m back.

The geology is limestone and there is plenty to see including; sea urchins, anemones, turban shells, sea stars, octopus, prawns, cray fish, cuttlefish, blue devils and ox eyes, juvenile pink snapper, hard and soft corals, nudibranchs and even lionfish! Take a torch for the overhanging ledges and move the kelp out of the way to peer underneath – Wear gloves! Caves, such as they are, are tight. Be careful of overhead environments.

Snorkelling at Fish Hook Bay

A secluded, enclosed bay with calm shallow water and pristine snorkelling conditions

Details

  • Activities:Snorkelling
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

Fish Hook Bay is located on the western coastline of Rottnest Island, named for its curved shape reminiscent of a fish-hook. The bay features a sandy, white shore for sun-bakers and a vibrant community of fish for curious snorkellers and divers to discover. 

Image used with permission from Rottnest Island Authority. 

Snorkelling At Little Armstrong Bay

Lined by reef and bordered by coastal land features such as archways and caverns, Little Armstrong Bay is popular amongst seaside adventurers.

Details

  • Activities:Snorkelling
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

Little Armstrong Bay is located on the North Point of Rottnest Island, within a marine sanctuary protecting the diverse fishlife inhabiting the area. 

It is suitable for an array of recreational activities including swimming, coastal exploration and snorkelling. 

Image used with permission from Tourism WA. 

Snorkelling at Little Parakeet Bay

Calm conditions for snorkellers of all abilities with plenty of opportunities for fish-spotting

Details

  • Activities:Snorkelling
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

Busiest in summer and earlier in the mornings, Little Parakeet Bay is great for snorkelling and swimming, protected by the surrounding reef and enclosed by the cliff faces. It is within cycling distance of the settlement so you can make an afternoon of it and soak your feet in the cooling water after your journey. 

 

Snorkelling At Mary Cove

A secluded snorkelling experience in one of Kitson Point's idyllic enclosed coves

Details

  • Activities:Snorkelling
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

Snorkellers of varying abilities will be able to enjoy exploring the coral and fish population living amongst the reef system in Mary Cove, a southern facing protected cove along Rottnest Island's Kitson Point. 

Check beachsafe.org.au for swell conditions before setting out to ensure conditions are suitable. 

Image used with permission from Rottnest Island Authority. 

Snorkelling at Omeo Shipwreck

Discover Coogee's haunting Omeo shipwreck from the water on the award-winning Maritime Trail

Details

  • Activities:Snorkelling
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

Located only 25 metres from the shore, the dive and snorkel trail begin at the Omeo shipwreck and includes:

  • Underwater access to the Omeo shipwreck
  • Underwater art gallery
  • Artificial reef.

The underwater trail begins in shallow water while its westernmost extent reaches a maximum depth of 7 metres. Most of the trail is around 2.5 to 5 metres deep, making it suitable for snorkelers and novice divers. 
The artificial reef and underwater art sculptures around the shipwreck create a linear dive trail and habitat for aquatic life. Underwater educational plaques give information about the Omeo shipwreck, maritime history and aquatic life in the area.

Snorkelling at Uribes Shipwreck

Snorkel by this Scottish braque in Rottnest Island's bustling Thomson Bay

Details

  • Activities:Snorkelling
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

The remains of Uribes lie in the shallow, 3–4 metres waters with parts of the ship's machinery and hull well preserved for snorkellers to peruse. In good weather, it is a safe dive for snorkellers and close to the shore.

Image used with permission from Tourism Western Australia. 

Snorkelling the Alex T. Brown Shipwreck

Immerse yourself in WA history with a snorkel around the iconic Alex T. Brown shipwreck.

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  • Activities:Snorkelling
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

Since it wrecked in 1917, the remains constantly change in appearance. Winter storms and swell can see up to 12m of the wreck exposed, but even in the height of summer, timbers can still be seen above the water mark. Timbers from the wreck were salvaged by local Yanchep residents, and can still be found in structures such as the Yanchep Inn.

Surfing at City Beach

City Beach is a left hand beach break that breaks off the groyne and is often crowded as it can only support a small crowd of surfers. Popular location for groms.

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  • Activities:Surfing
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

City Beach Groyne works best during the winter months in easterly winds and west-southwest swells. The break is a short ride that breaks beside the groyne over a shallow sand bank and is best suited to the intermediate surfer.

 

 

Surfing at Cottesloe Beach

Cottesloe is a fairly exposed beach and groyne break that is relatively consistent all year around.

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  • Activities:Surfing
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

Cottesloe Beach offers left and right-handers on either side of the groyne, with the south side being a popular break for long borders and stand up paddle boarders. The break works best in offshore east-southeasterly winds with swells coming from the southwest, on a mean tide. During summer the break will reamin relatively flat however, it will sometimes produce a small rolling wave perfect for the beginner surfer. Cottesloe is often crowded, especially when the waves are good. Beware of the reef, rocks and rips. 

 

 

 

Surfing at Lancelin

Lancelin Back Beach is a popular beach break for surfers of all abilities and ages.

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  • Activities:Surfing
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

Located just 90 minutes north of Perth, Lancelin is the perfect destination for a day trip, however be prepared to get up early with the best waves being in the morning when the winds are light. There are several waves on offer along this stretch of coastline with the most popular one being Back beach. The best waves roll in during mid-tide with eaterly winds and swells coming from the west-southwest. When the waves and weather are good, Back Beach can often get crowded but if you get sick of surfing the real waves, you can head up to the dunes and give sandboarding a go. 

Surfing At Scarborough Beach

Scarborough Beach break is a popular location for beginner surfers and surf schools, with waves remaining relatively small all year round.

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  • Activities:Surfing
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

Scarborough works best during Winter on all tides with offshore winds from the east and swells from the west. There is a variety of left and rights on offer along this stretch of coast and when the decent sets roll in, the crowds pick up. Scarborough beach is also a very popular spot for surf schools, with several companies offering learn to surf programs throughout the summer months. 

 

 

 

Surfing at Stark Bay

A surf break featuring exposed reef and a reliably consistent western swell.

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  • Activities:Surfing
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

A reef break that provides consistent surfing conditions through the colder months whilst maintaining calmer conditions during the summer. Stark Bay is rarely crowded and is located on the western side of the island near Bovell Way and Strickland Bay. 

Image used with permission from Rottnest Island Authority. 

 

Surfing at The Fruit Bowl

A challenging but rewarding surfing break located between two beautiful bays just off the coast of Rottnest Island.

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  • Activities:Surfing
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

The Fruit Bowl sits between Catherine Bay and City of York Bay, reachable via Bovell Way. It is also known as Ricey Beach West. Better suited for more experienced surfers, it makes for a more secluded surfing experience, with the break scarcely populated throughout the week and over the week-end. 

Surfing At Trigg Beach

Trigg Beach is one of Perths most popular and consistent waves, offering a fun beach and point break with both left and right handers for a range of abilities.

Details

  • Activities:Surfing
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

Trigg is a very popular location for all surfing abilities, offering a range a waves along the coast. Trigg beach works best at all tides with an eaterly wind and swells from the west south-west. In winter, the better swells roll in and the crowds can pick up immensly. Around summer the waves die off, making the beach break a popular location for summer surf schools. 

 

Wildflowers of Toodyay

Less than 2 hours away from Perth and situated on the Avon River, this town features wildflower hotspots, where you can find Drummond's wattles, white cottonhead and the endangerd star sun orchid.

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  • Activities:Wildflowers
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

For an easy walk to find wildflowers, follow along the trail at Dawn Atwell Nature Reserve which is five kilometres long.

Wongamine Reserve consists of dirt track and firebreaks for 6.5 kilometres.

Bilya Walk Track follows the Avon River for 7.2 kilometres and has seating for breaks.

Wildflowers of York

Known for its bountiful yellow canola fields that bloom in August and September, if you travel a further north you will find some of the most stunning wildflower trails in WA.

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  • Activities:Wildflowers
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

Oswald Sargent Nature Reserve is only 5 kilometres west of York, where you can find wildflowers such as glory peas, white milkmaids and cowslip orchids. Mokine Reserve feature plenty of views of the landscape and wildflowers including sundews, mirbelias and violet hovea.

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