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Diving Activities Things to do in Perth and Surrounds

Things To Do in Perth And Surrounds


region=perth-and-surrounds&type=things-to-do&categories=10778


Diving at Crystal Palace

Situated on the south east side of the Island this ‘hidden’ dive site is spectacular.

Details

  • Activities:Diving
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

Positioned approximately 850m South west of Dyer Island, ‘Crystals’ has a depth range of 8-18m.Entering the water, which is generally quite calm due to the position of the site, the first thing you will notice is the sheer amount of caves and swim through’s that you can see just from the surface. Looking down you will know straight away that 1 tank is not going to be enough!

As you descend into this array of caves you will see many fish of all species scarper into different directions to make way for you. This is the site where you are most likely to see just about every species of fish you are likely to encounter around Rottnest in the 1 dive! From the colourful Harlequin fish to the breathtaking big Blue Gropers, that can push you backwards just from the power of a tail kick in the opposite direction. Stay there a while though because he is sure to return curiously to see his new ‘Scuba friend’.

Once you have had a good look around over the top of the reef, begin to explore the subterranean caves for more exciting encounters! On this dive expect to see large Samson fish, the occasional Dhufish, Western Blue Devils, Buffalo Bream, Morwongs, Box fish, Leather-jackets and of course Crayfish! The topography of Crystal Palace is just brilliant with constant caves, holes and swim through’s; this is a dive that you will not get bored with. The site covers around 6-800m of awesome reef, which will excite even the most experienced diver.

For diving enquiries, contact Perth Scuba. 

Diving at Point Peron

This is a fair weather dive site with many swim throughs and one or two larger caves. Popular for snorkellers as well, so it’s a great family day out.

Details

  • Activities:Diving
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

Entry is easy via a few steps with a hand rail into the water. There is a swim of about 130m to mushroom rocks, 300m to the suggested dive site (depth 7m) and it’s about 500m to the outer reef which lies in about 10m. There are reefs to the North which are a bit of a hike to lug equipment to but worth it if you are looking for deeper caves and swim throughs.

This site is part of the Shoal Water Islands Marine Park. An alternative entry for diving the Northern Point is the car park on the Northern side of the peninsular. But a long and boring swim over sand.

The geology is limestone and whilst largely fished out, there is nevertheless plenty to see including: Sea urchins, anemones, turban shells, sea stars, octopus, sea horses, and lots of colourful growth including hard and soft corals and bait fish which are predated upon by the penguins, etc. Take a torch for the caves but be careful of overhead environments.

Diving at Porpoise Bay Caves

Almost directly linked to Crystal Palace, towards the Island, directly out of Porpoise Bay, Porpoise Bay Caves make for an exciting second dive after the ‘Palace'.

Details

  • Activities:Diving
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

There are brilliant photographic opportunities here with divers quite regularly seeing Sea Turtles, Leafy Sea Dragons and Fire fish (a species of Lionfish). This dive is simply a sit back and watch the world go by, or explore the caves until your heart is content type of dive. No cave here is the same.

Crayfish hunters be sure to take your loop with you, the Crayfish are big out here!

The best way to dive Porpoise bay caves is to start on the southern end of the reef and work your way toward the island. Be sure to get a good compass bearing, as many caves look alike from the surface and the currents here are a little stronger than Crystal Palace.

The dive is such an exciting array of caves that you will very easily lose track of where you are and that could lead to a long swim back to the boat if you are not careful. This dive site has a maximum depth of around 18m and runs up to about 8m. Choose this site when winds are light to non-existent as this site does ‘chop up’ fairly quickly on a stiff breeze, which can make the dive a little uncomfortable.

Marine life you can expect to see here are similar to Crystal Palace and you can be sure to see something new every time you dive here.

Contact Perth Scuba for further information and diving enquiries. 

Diving At Swirl Reef

So called because of the “footprint” visible on the surface of the water after a swell has passed through.

Details

  • Activities:Diving
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

The reef is virtually formed like a crater with a hollow in the center and many swim through’s accessible from the inside, especially the northwest and southeast sections of the reef. The most awesome swim through is accessible only from the outside and is again on the northwest side, with a huge cavernous opening at seabed level.

Contact Perth Scuba for diving enquiries. 

Diving at the Macedon and Denton Holmes Wrecks

The resting ground of not one but two shipwrecks - perfect for underwater exploration.

Details

  • Activities:Diving
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

The Macedon was built in Liverpool in 1870 and was carrying 50 horses along with its cargo and passengers before it hit rock and sunk in 1883. A few years later in 1890, cargo vessel Denton Holmes joined it at the bottom of the sea after striking the reef off Rottnest Island's coastline. 

Located virtually on top of each other, these wrecks lie on top of Kingston Reef just out from Thompson’s Bay. They have been prone to a lot of swell and surge, so apart from timber and iron remnants there is not a lot left. Watch out when you anchor near here and do NOT tie up to the big yellow mooring, as the local glass bottom boat cruises in here to show people the wreck.

For diving enquiries, contact Perth Scuba. 

 

Diving at the Wreck Of The Shark

Lying in the shallow water near the beach at Henrietta Rocks, the shipwreck provides an exciting environment for adventurous snorkellers.

Details

  • Activities:Diving,Snorkelling
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

 

The Shark met its end when it crashed into the reef around Rottnest Island, and now sits 50m off from the shoreline. Visible from the lookout over Henrietta Rocks, the wreck is home to a crew of fishy folk. 

Image used with permission from Rottnest Island Authority. 

 

Diving at Yanchep Dog Beach

This is a fair weather shore dive good for crays when they are of size and not well concealed towards the outer edge of the reef.

Details

  • Activities:Diving
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

If the sea has been calm for a few days you’ll get good Viz.

Entry is easy via a 180m track (gear up in the car park). There are two options; a short swim over very shallow reef to the North to 4m marked above, or a longer track which is about 550m out to the outside of the outer reef which maxes out at 10m.If you do this track travel South along the reef for 200m (make sure you penetrate the reef occasionally to make the most of it), then swim 550m back.

The geology is limestone and there is plenty to see including; sea urchins, anemones, turban shells, sea stars, octopus, prawns, cray fish, cuttlefish, blue devils and ox eyes, juvenile pink snapper, hard and soft corals, nudibranchs and even lionfish! Take a torch for the overhanging ledges and move the kelp out of the way to peer underneath – Wear gloves! Caves, such as they are, are tight. Be careful of overhead environments.

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