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(All) Activities Things to do in South West

Things To Do in Australias South West


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Climbing at Bob’s Hollow

15km south of the town of Margaret River is a little corner of paradise called Bob's Hollow, one of WA’s best sport climbing crags, offering steep limestone walls and more than 20 established routes.

Details

  • Activities:Rock Climbing
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

Bob’s is famous for steep limestone walls, strange stalactite formations and white sandy beaches. Mostly climbs of 15-20m. Reach the top and be rewarded with breathtaking views of the ocean and surrounding bushland. It is not a sea cliff though; the crag is around 100m inland from the beach.

The crag is a beautiful limestone cliff with vertical to steep overhanging walls. The limestone is generally very solid, although it has only a hard outer crust. Some parts of the cliff, such as the large open cave in the southern section of the crag, show the soft sandy material that lies behind the crust. Be warned that limestone caves and overhangs are potentially dangerous – there have been instances of limestone caves collapsing along the coast.

Almost all climbs are equipped with glue-in bolts and lower-off anchors so you can leave the rack at home: all you’ll be needing is a set of draws, although, a few climbs require bolts plates so check the route descriptions.

Bob’s Hollow can be climbed at all year round. Although it gets very hot in summer, the cliff faces east so it gets morning shade, with the northern most section being in shade until around 2pm. In other seasons, the crag can be climbed at all day, even if there is light rain although high humidity will make all the holds very greasy.

WARNING

The Bob’s Hollow crag is situated in the Leeuwin-Naturaliste Nation Park and is managed by WA’s Conservation and Land Management (CALM) body. The CALM management plan for the park states that climbing is not permitted on any limestone cliffs within the national park. Therefore, you climb at Bob’s Hollow at your own risk. Camping is not permitted here – at the car park or in the cave. CALM will fine you if they catch you.

ACCESS

There are a number of options for getting to Bob’s Hollow. If you have a 4WD you can drive to the crag via a rocky track. From Margaret River, travel south along Caves Rd. Approximately 2.5 km south of the Redgate Rd intersection, turn right (west) onto an unsealed track (Bob’s Hollow Rd), which is opposite the Calgardup Cave car park. The drive to the crag along the track takes around 15 min. The track is pretty rough with some tricky rocky sections to negotiate and thick scrub close to the track on either side just waiting to put scratches in your paintwork. A 4WD with decent clearance and low range is required here – no Subaru’s or Honda’s unless you’re happy to collect a few dents and potentially more serious damage on the under-body. At the car park, walk down the gully to the north and follow the base of the cliff, past the cave, for around 200m to the first routes (Northern End).

If you don’t have a 4WD or don’t want to risk any damage, you’re going to have to walk around 45 mins. You can walk along the 4WD track however it is much nicer to walk in along Conto’s Beach from the south. Follow Caves Rd past the 4WD track entrance and turn right at the Lake Cave entrance. After several hundred metres turn left into Conto Rd and continue for approximately 4 km before turning right at the Conto Spring Beach sign. Proceed to car park. From the car park walk north along the beach for about 45 minutes to Bob’s Hollow. You will walk past Split Rock, a rocky point and from there you will have a further 300m before you see the Bob’s Hollow cliffs a couple of hundred metres inland. There are several tracks into Bob’s from the beach.

 

Climbing at Wallcliffe

The sweep of limestone stretches along the southern bank of the picturesque Margaret River.

Details

  • Activities:Rock Climbing
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

Wallcliffe | A sport climbing area with almost 20 established routes, Walcliffe is located near Prevelly Park and accessed off Caves Road via Surfers Point Road. The deceptively steep sweep of limestone stretches for 100m along the southern bank of the picturesque Margaret River. There is an interesting bouldering area on the right-hand end of the cliff with safe landings, featuring numerous edges, pockets and slopers, plus a long traverse with many variants.

Climbing at Wilyabrup

The cliffs are well worth the rock climbing and abseiling if that’s your thing, or just explore around and admire the incredibly beautiful and dramatic coastal views.

Details

  • Activities:Rock Climbing
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

Wilyabrup | The largest and best-known climbing spot in the region, this is superb, sun-drenched granite stretching over 500m along the ocean front. There are many climbs for various grades, and options for traditional climbing. One of the most famous climbs has a resident carpet python on it (we won’t tell you which one!). Access is off Wilyabrup Road and a short but beautiful hike in. Follow the sound of crashing waves. 

Diving at Busselton Jetty

This is the second longest wooden jetty in the southern hemisphere.

Details

  • Activities:Diving
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

Best area to dive is about the last 300mtrs of the jetty, you can dive it using the tourist train that takes you almost all the way out, but check on running times first. You can also hire a trolley from Naturaliste Dive (you pass it on the way to the jetty) but 2kms is a hell of a walk (don’t even think about carrying your gear!!!!). 

Simplest method is a boat, you don’t need anything huge as it’s very protected here and the ramp is right next to the jetty. If you get a bit cool during your dive, the bakery next to the dive shop make the most awesome pastries (pies, sausage rolls etc). 

This is also the best night dive!

Diving at Fish Eyes

Reef line along sand which consists of granite boulders covered with a wide variety of hard coral, soft coral and sponges.

Details

  • Activities:Diving
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

You will find a wide variety of fish life and echinoderms. Towards the end of this dive you will come into “leafy sea dragon country” which we often see at this site. You can often see sea lions and occasionally turtles, believe it or not!!

To find, proceed to Black Point from the Fishery Beach Marina. Approximately half way along the cliffs you will find a sculpted rock hole in the shape of an eye socket. Anchor at the base of this. Once in the water, proceed east following the cliffs.

Diving at HMAS Perth Wreck

The former HMAS Perth guided missile destroyer was scuttled in 35m of water in King George Sound in November 2001.

Details

  • Activities:Diving
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

Serving in the Royal Australian Navy, the HMAS Perth sailed more than a million nautical miles in deployments around the world. The vessel was damaged by enemy fire in the Vietnam conflict. Thankfully, no one was injured as the shell punctured the vessel but failed to explode.

The 133m destroyer now provides divers with a wonderful opportunity to explore its underwater interiors.

Surfing at Boranup Beach

Boranup Beach is a powerful exposed beach break that offers left and right-handers that are suitable to all skills levels.

Details

  • Activities:Surfing
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

Boranup Beach offers realtively consistent surf, especially during the Winter months. The break works on all tides with the best waves rolling in with offshore winds coming from the north-northeast and swells from the west-southwest. The break is relatively isolated so even on good days, the crowds tend to be limited. On smaller days, the waves are not as powerful, making the break perfect for beginners, especially with the soft sand bank. Beware of rips and sharks. 

Boranup Beach can be accessed via a bumpy 4x4 track off Boranup Drive. Once you reach the end off the track you then head north along the beach to the break, however the sand can be very soft so make sure do let your tyres down otherwise you could get bogged. 

 

Surfing at Injidup Beach

Indjidup is home to three breaks - Car Parks, The Point and Pea Break, with all breaking best in a sou-east wind, although The Point can also be surfed in a sou-westerly.

Details

  • Activities:Surfing
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

Pea Break would have to be the best out of the three, yet can be inconsistent. Car Parks on the other hand is quite consistent and can get crowded.

Surfing at Lefthanders

Lefthanders is an exposed reef break home to Ulus, Noisies, Lefties and Umbies, all of which are suited to a variety of different skill levels.

Details

  • Activities:Surfing
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

After a long but worthy walk from the carpark you will initailly reach Ulus, Noisies and Lefties, all relatively easy waves. Further along the coast is Umbies, a well known board breaker that is best to take a look at before paddling straight out. Collectively, each of these breaks offer hollow and heavy lefthanders with thick lips and fast rides, with each wave varying in difficulty. Leftanders is a fairly consistent wave, with the break performing at its best at mid-high tide, with offshore easterly winds and swells coming from the west-southwest. This collection of breaks is best suited to the intermediate to advanced surfer depending on the break and conditions. Beware of rocks and crowds, as it is often a popular location when the conditions are right. 

 

Surfing At North Point

This right hand reef break is known to produce some of the greatest, heavy duty swells along the South West coast.

Details

  • Activities:Surfing
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

North Point is an exposed reef break with relatively consistent waves throughout the year, but truly comes to life during Winter. When North Point comes to life, it is capable of producing a long, winding right hand barrel that offers multiple pit sections and ramps and as the sets get bigger, the waves become progressively heavier and hollow. The break works best during mid to high tide, with offshore winds from the east northeast and swells from the southwest. North point, especially when it picks up, is best suited to experienced surfers, and for the first timers, its best to sit back and observe before paddling out. It is often a popular destination for pro surfers, especially during the Margret River Pro, making it an awesome location to just sit out on the point and spectate. 

 

 

 

Surfing at Redgate

Redgate beach break is perfect for beginners and is often a popular site for surf schools. The break is also fully capable of producing a punchy A-frame, exciting and fun for the intermediate surfer.

Details

  • Activities:Surfing
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

Redgate beach is a fairly consistent break that is perfect for beginners however, is very capable of producing some epic fast barrels and nice long rides. The break works best during mid tide with winds from the east and swells from the south southwest. When a decent swell rolls in, theres the option to position yourself out near the great big rock and ride the right handers. For those after a left, down the south end of the beach there's a few lefts on offer and the crowds are usually a lot smaller. Beware of rips, rocks and crowds, espically when the weathers nice. 

 

Surfing at Rivermouth

Margret River River Mouth is a fantastic beach break for surfing, body boarding and body surfing, all year round.

Details

  • Activities:Surfing
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

The River Mouth is perfect for beginners and is a popular location for the local surf schools. The beach break works best in offshore easterly winds and south-southwest swells. The break favours rights and when the swell picks up, it can become relatively crowded.

 

 

 

 

Surfing at South Point and Huzzas

Located in the bay of Gracetown, South Point and Huzzas (Huzzawuiie) are both perfect for the inexperienced to intermediate surfer.

Details

  • Activities:Surfing
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

Straight down the stairs from the South Point carpark is Huzzas which produces a long rolling wave with a left and right wall, perfect for beginners. South Point offers a slow rolling left hander, perfect for the intermediate surfer and those not quite ready to take on North Point. South Point is located further out from Huzzas and directly across the bay from North Point and is accessbile via the dirt track from the carpak that takes you out to the point. Each break works best on a south easterly wind and south westerly swells. 

 

Surfing at Surfers Point

Surfers Point is an ideal place to watch some of the best Indian Ocean waves be ridden - or ride them yourself!

Details

  • Activities:Surfing
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

Being home to the international Margaret River Drug Aware Pro, here is where you can watch the best surfers in the world compete and what a show they put on. With big tiered grassy areas to sit and watch and easy stairs to run down to get out amongst it, Surfers Point is the place to be. Did I mention the mind blowing sunsets? Incredible!


Surfers Point is very consistent and made up of two waves, Mainbreak and Southsides, which are both left and right handers. Both draw any swell and can be surfed in southerly through to northerly winds. They're not for the faint hearted though - Mainbreak often reaches 20 foot!

Surfing at The Box

The Box is an intense right-hander with a thick lip that loves to hurl a surfer on to the shelf. The break certainly makes it on to the list of Australia's most dangerous waves.

Details

  • Activities:Surfing
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

The Box is located a couple of hundread meters out, just accross the bay from Surfers Point. Its an intense 'specialty wave', suited to the advanced surfer. The Box works well in south-west swells with easterly winds, at high tide. The wave can be tricky and once you get pushed out into the channel, you'll experience some of the most intense seconds you could ever imagine. For The Box you'll need a good strong board that's thicker and longer (varies depending on the size of the swells), as well as tick wetsuit for both warmth and protection. This break is strickly for the expierenced and advanced surfers and will often be used in conjuntion with Main Break, during the Margret River Pro. When you're out there, be sure to keep watch of whats comming including big sets and pointed fins. 

 

 

 

 

Surfing at Three Bears

You'll need 4WD to get to Three Bears along Sugar Loaf Road, but once there you'll have the choice of three breaks which will make it worth your while!

Details

  • Activities:Surfing
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

Out the back you'll find Papa's which can handle some serious size. Next in is Mamas, which works best on the left and at mid-tide, offering a heavy drop and speedy walls. Baby's produces some nice spiralling lefts aswell as a few decent rights off the peak and should not be overlooked. Each of these breaks work well in a south west swell and east to north-east wind. No matter the size of the waves, beware of regular clean-up sets. 

 

Surfing at Windmills

Windmills is a popular summertime surf spot, with consistently good banks breaking over patches of reef.

Details

  • Activities:Surfing
  • Type:Activity Sites

Description

Windmills is a great summer wave and is espeially popular when the swell is small. The break works best at mid tide with easterly offshore winds and swells from the west southwest. Windmills offers both lefts and rights, producing hollow waves with tubely sections. The break is best suited to the intermediate surfer however, you'll often find the expereinced local or pro surfer out having a bit of fun. 

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