中文
Select Page

Places To Go in Albany

Discover what's going on in arts, events & culture

Discover what’s going on in arts, events & culture.

Check out travel guides for regional WA

Check out travel guides for regional Western Australia.

Explore winery guides for Perth and regional WA

Check out winery guides for Perth and regional WA.

Places To Go in Albany


scroll=y


Fishing At Cosy Corner Beach

One of the most beautiful beaches in the area, with crystal clear waters and white sand.

Details

  • Activities:Fishing
  • Facilities:BBQ,Camping Allowed,Picnic Facilities
  • Natural Attractions:Beaches & Bays

Description

The fishing is great, with Salmon, Salmon Trout, Skippy Herring, Whiting, Silver Bream and Pike to be caught. You can also launch a boat from the area. 

Lake Seppings

Lake Seppings offers plenty of lookouts, seating areas and even a camouflaged bird hide for twitching.

Details

  • Activities:Walking
  • Natural Attractions:Rivers & Lakes

Description

 

Lake Seppings Bird Walk

This easy 2.7 kilometre return walk around Lake Seppings is popular with birdwatchers – it’s is home to over 100 species, including white ibis, yellow-billed spoonbill and the white-faced heron. There are plenty of lookouts, seating areas and even a camouflaged bird hide for twitching. The gravel trail surface and boardwalks are wheelchair accessible. The lake is situated in a nature reserve and is regardedas one of the best places to bird watch (particularly water birds). It is surrounded by a mixture of reeds and bullrushes. Lake Sepping has been dubbed 'The place of the longneck tortoise" by the local indigenous Australians.


 

 

 

Stirling Range National Park

Stirling Range National Park encloses the only major mountain range with in the southern half of Western Australia.

Details

  • Natural Attractions:National Parks & Reserves
  • Activities:Walking
  • Facilities:BBQ,Toilets

Description

The rugged peaks, which rise to more than 1000 metres above sea level, feature stark cliff faces, sheltered gullies, magnificent views and a rich diversity of unique and colourful wildflowers.  The park is one of the world’s most important areas for flora with 1500 species, many of which grow nowhere else, packed within its boundaries.

Mountain moods

The Stirling Range is renowned for its unusual, and sometimes spectacular cloud formations. The Aboriginal name for the range, Koi Kyenunu-ruff, means ‘mist rolling around the mountains’ – a frequently seen occurrence. The range is also one of few places in Western Australia where snow occasionally falls.

Stay awhile

Moingup Spring is a lovely bush camp set amongst jarrah and marri trees and centrally located in the park. Camping fees apply. Stirling Range Retreat and Mt Trio Bush Camping and Caravan Park2, both on the park’s northern boundary, offer a range of accommodation and services.

Scenic driving

The Stirling Range Drive winds through the heart of the park and offers ever-changing views of rugged peaks, each with its unique character. This 42km drive, on mostly unsealed roads graded for two-wheel drive, stretches from the Western Lookout near Red Gum Spring to the Eastern Lookout below Bluff Knoll. Take a break in the drive to enjoy sweeping vistas from Central Lookout or a picnic in shady woodlands at White Gum Flat.

Mountain bushwalks

Walking is an ideal way to discover the rugged beauty and enchanting wildflowers of the Stirling Range. There are established walks up Bluff Knoll, Mt Trio, Mt Toolbrunup, Mt Hassell, Talyuberlup Peak and Mt Magog. All walks are steep and have uneven surfaces. Wear boots or sturdy footwear, weatherproof clothing and sun protection. Take plenty of food and carry two to three litres of drinking water per person for half to full day walks. Several walks have a picnic area at the start.

If you are considering undertaking the Stirling Range Ridge Walk, also known as the Eastern Peaks Ridge Route, or other cross country walks, you are advised to contact the Stirling Range National Park rangers or the Albany District Office to obtain more detailed information. (Stirling Range National Park office – 9827 9230; Albany District office – 9842 4500)

The Ridge Walk is approximately 26km one way from the north east corner of the park boundary via Ellen Peak to the Bluff Knoll Car park. This is a difficult and challenging, unmarked, cross country bushwalk with no designated trail through a Wilderness Zone. It takes two to three days to complete hiking in rugged terrain. This bushwalk is not a managed route and natural hazards exist. Walkers are responsible for their personal safety and will need to ensure they are well planned, prepared and exercise appropriate caution. To undertake the Ridge Walk bushwalkers require previous experience in the outdoors and a high level of specialised skills and equipment including navigation skills, a map and navigation equipment to complete the walk. Bushwalkers need to be self-reliant, particularly in regard to emergency first aid and be prepared for unforseen weather conditions which may be extreme. Storms and severe weather may affect navigation and safety. Walkers undertaking this route are strongly advised to carry their own Personal Locator Beacon and mobile communication devices in case of emergencies.

Weather wise

The peaks of the Stirling Range are subject to rapid, unpredictable changes in the weather. Hikers should be prepared for sudden cold changes that cause the temperature to drop and rain or hail to set in. All visitors are strongly advised not to enter the bush or use footpaths on days of extreme fire danger. If you are planning to hike off marked trails, abseil or rock climb, please register your details at the shelter in the picnic area across the road from Bluff Knoll Road entry station. If you plan to hike on an established walk, no registration is required.

 

Stony Hill

This 500m heritage-listed walk to a rocky outcrop in Torndirrup National Park has plaques along the way inscribed with the thoughts of the original settlers and has great views.

Details

  • Activities:Walking
  • Facilities:Walking Trails
  • Natural Attractions:Lookouts

Description

Stony Hill

This 500m heritage-listed walk to a rocky outcrop in Torndirrup National Park has plaques along the way inscribed with the thoughts of the original settlers and has great views. Take Frenchman Bay Road and turn right about 1km south of Salmon Hole Road. The town of Albany , The Princess Royal Harbour and KIng George Sound are visible from the spectacular northerly views. Stony HIll overlooks the wildflowers during the popular season and the stone giants stand impressively throughout the entire coast. Bush waking attire is recommended. 

 

 

Torndirrup National Park

The most visited National Park in WA, it draws punters for its wave-carved features including the Natural Bridge, The Gap, and the Blowholes, plus the chance to spot whales from the sea cliffs.

Details

  • Natural Attractions:National Parks & Reserves
  • Activities:Fishing,Walking
  • Facilities:Walking Trails

Description

Torndirrup National Park

10km south of Albany on Frenchman Bay Road, this rugged national park is the most visited in WA, and draws punters for its wave-carved features including the Natural Bridge, The Gap, and the Blowholes, plus the chance to spot whales from the sea cliffs. There are lookouts and short walk trails from the car park near the main entrance: Stony Hill Heritage Trail is a 500m scenic circuit that gives 360-degree views of the park and back over Albany, or take the six-minute return walk to the Jimmy Newells Harbour lookout (for some more challenging walks, see ‘hiking’). This is also where you’ll find some of Albany’s best fishing action, head down the steep steps to Salmon Holes where, as you can guess, there’s an abundance of salmon and snapper in this beautiful bay. Fishing is good off the beach and the rocks but be aware that king waves have claimed lives, so it’s a good idea to wear a life jacket. It’s also a popular surf spot. Whale World is also within the borders of the park (see ‘Historic Albany’ section). Sitting below the ex-whaling station to the east is the secluded, north-facing Misery Beach, a clean stretch of sand that offers shelter in most weather conditions for swimming and snorkelling. There are no camping or other facilities in the park. 

Two Peoples Bay National Park

This park boasts some great swimming, fishing and beach walking spots and is accessible by 2WD.

Details

  • Activities:Fishing,Walking
  • Natural Attractions:National Parks & Reserves

Description

Two Peoples Bay National Park

Don’t be alarmed if you hear some awful noises while in this reserve – it’s home to the noisy-scrub bird, and their calls are particularly loud during mating season (May-Sep). 35km east of Albany, this park also boasts some great swimming, fishing and beach walking spots and is accessible by 2WD. Head to Little Beach or Waterfall Beach for pretty, calm waters that are well-sheltered and good for kids  (it’s a good rule of thumb to stick to beaches that are accessed by marked paths along this dangerous coastline). The bay is good for boat fishing, and you can launch from the beach near the end of Two Peoples Bay Road. There is a 4.6km Heritage Trail that takes four hours from the Visitor Centre to Little Beach (take a towel). The centre is open 10am-4pm during summer holidays, sporadically during winter, and has information about the local history, wildlife and conservation projects (08 9846 4276). There are also nearby picnic tables, free gas barbecues and toilets nearby. There is no drinking water or camping in the park.  

 

 

West Cape Howe National Park

Stunning Shelley Beach is a lovely swimming spot and a good place to throw a line, or head to The Steps for great rock fishing.

Details

  • Activities:4WDing,Fishing,Rock Climbing,Walking
  • Natural Attractions:National Parks & Reserves

Description

West Cape Howe National Park

This park between Denmark and Albany is the most southern point in WA and its seacliffs and wild beaches draw rock climbers, beachgoers, bushwalkers, hang-gliders, surfers and fishermen. 2WD vehicles can access the park via Shelley Beach Road, but almost all the other sites within the park require a 4WD. There are a few camping bays at Shelley Beach (the winding gravel road should not be attempted by anyone towing a caravan) along with the only toilets in the park.

Experienced rock climbers will find kilometres of high quality climbing routes at West Cape Howe, but be careful of loose rock towards the top, and changing sea conditions at the base (always check conditions before attempting). There are a handful of 4WD tracks through the park; one of the most challenging is the track to Broholm Beach (don’t even attempt it unless you have a serious 4WD, a tyre gauge, pump, radio and supplies). Always check with the Denmark or Albany visitor centres to see which tracks are open and if you’re equipped to handle them. Golden Gate Beach (4WD only) averages 2m waves, and is a popular surfing spot, but be cautious of the rocks scattered through the inner surf.  Australian salmon, shark, groper, mulloway, whiting and herring can be caught across the park. Stunning Shelley Beach is a lovely swimming spot and a good place to throw a line, or head to The Steps for good rock fishing (wear a life vest and check sea conditions). Easterly winds make the best conditions, particularly in summer, for hang-gliding and paragliding. The take-off spot is at the Shelley Beach lookout and you must register with the Department of Parks and Wildlife (08 9842 4500) before taking to the skies. 

You May Also Like

Picabar has been saved at last

Picabar has been saved at last

After almost a year of campaigning, Picabar has finally been saved! The popular Northbridge bar and rendezvous spot near the...
Read More
Madcap musical The Yeomen of the Guard lands this month

Madcap musical The Yeomen of the Guard lands this month

An ensemble musical comedy, The Yeomen of the Guard, is coming to UWA’s Dolphin Theatre for a gripping season from...
Read More
Singapore Airlines Swan Valley Wine Show returns in November

Singapore Airlines Swan Valley Wine Show returns in November

Dates have been announced for the 2019 Singapore Airlines Swan Valley Wine Show. Presented by the Swan Valley & Regional...
Read More
The Hope Fault premieres at WAAPA

The Hope Fault premieres at WAAPA

A rich tapestry of familial drama, The Hope Fault will premiere at WAAPA’s newly refurbished Enright Studio from 11 –...
Read More
Where to spend Oktoberfest in Perth

Where to spend Oktoberfest in Perth

Whether you’re an Oktoberfest first-timer (heaven forbid) or you’ve been 100 times before - chances are you haven’t heard about...
Read More
Two new cafes in Perth are calling for your coffee order

Two new cafes in Perth are calling for your coffee order

In an age of international days dedicated to anything from Mad Hatter to dog biscuits, let's face it - International...
Read More
What’s new at this year’s Ascot Racing Carnival

What’s new at this year’s Ascot Racing Carnival

Get ready to play this spring at the Ascot Racing Carnival, starting with Crown Perth Opening Day on Saturday October...
Read More
Leap into the school holidays with On Our Beach

Leap into the school holidays with On Our Beach

The school holidays are about to launch and Spare Parts Puppet Theatre has the perfect hands-on live adventure for the...
Read More
7 ways to embrace the school holidays

7 ways to embrace the school holidays

It’s easy to think of school holidays as a time to be ‘survived’ but with so much to do around...
Read More
Yirra Yaakin’s Zac James discusses Ice Land

Yirra Yaakin’s Zac James discusses Ice Land

How do you write about an issue as huge as meth? Personal experience helps. Zac James is Yirra Yaakin’s Associate...
Read More
SCOOP