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Albany is the first European settlement and the oldest port in WA. Vivid green hills give way to breathtaking, rugged coast, and an elegant heritage town with a plethora of food and wine, and a vibrant arts hub. Just over four hours from Perth, there is no ‘busy’ time here, making it perfect for lovers of nature and adventure.

A little extra driving through the scenic southwest brings you to the stylish seaside town of Albany. WA’s oldest port is now held in high regard as one of the state’s most breathtaking and versatile holiday hubs. Boasting some of the state’s premier attractions, you’ll want more than just a few days to explore national parks and beautiful beaches around the bustling port.

The journey south towards WA’s first European settlement gives you a glimpse of things to come, as you pass picturesque forests, farms, vineyards and fields. Visit one of the five local wineries to sample superb wines and some tasty treats – you’ll be treated like royalty.

With around 35,000 residents, the city sprawls, but there’s an abundance of excellent attractions in its CBD. Get your bearings by walking or cycling the 3km path that runs from the city harbour along iconic York Street, its historic buildings now playing home to bustling bars, boutiques and cafes.

Experience the legend that shaped a nation at the acclaimed National ANZAC Centre, a museum that commemorates Albany’s special place in the history of the First World War, giving visitors a deeply personal connection with the spirit of our brave soldiers. Away from the CBD, Albany is a city surrounded by truly stunning nature. Get the wind in your hair and sun on your back on dramatic peaks and rugged coastlines. The land here is a vast, untouched panorama of beauty that feels like it’s your own to personally peruse.

Splash about swimming, surfing or fishing one of the many beautiful breaks along the rugged coastline, or watch humpback whales, dolphins and seals frolic at their favourite breeding spots.

There’s a plethora of national parks to admire in every direction, a dazzling display of diverse flora, and a bevy of bird-watching sites among beautiful natural coves, ranges and rivers.

Step it up a gear and get off the beaten track for 4WD adventures, bike paths past breathtaking beaches and bush land, or mountain biking and hiking along the Bibbulmun Track, Munda Biddi trail and other specialty tracks.

Deep-sea enthusiasts can also sink beneath the waves on the HMAS Perth wreck, or snorkel at Whaler’s Beach at Frenchman Bay. Alternatively, just relax at one of the city’s historic venues, artisanal stores, Indigenous art galleries or two renowned farmers markets. It’s a lot to take in, so plan ahead, and give yourself plenty of time.

Place to stay

There is a range of low-to-high priced accommodation in Albany, from seaside resorts and luxury coastal homes to rugged cottages and B&Bs among nature.

Getting there

Albany is a four-and-a-half hour, 415km drive southeast of Perth on Albany Highway, with the pretty wine region of Mt Barker on the way. TransWA operates daily bus services via Williams, Gnowangerup and Bunbury.
TIP The weather changes like the landscape in Albany; if travelling in winter, pack warm.

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Image credits: Tourism WA
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